“On My Mind” benchmark focuses on students’ mental health

Collage%21+Nancee+Crider+explains+how+to+make+the+collage+to+Walter+Archer.%0A
Back to Article
Back to Article

“On My Mind” benchmark focuses on students’ mental health

Collage! Nancee Crider explains how to make the collage to Walter Archer.

Collage! Nancee Crider explains how to make the collage to Walter Archer.

Ben Blackie

Collage! Nancee Crider explains how to make the collage to Walter Archer.

Ben Blackie

Ben Blackie

Collage! Nancee Crider explains how to make the collage to Walter Archer.

Ben Blackie, Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






As the third marking period comes to an end many teachers are preparing their students for their benchmark projects or tests. However, one benchmark project stands out. The “On My Mind” project lets Nancee Crider’s students visualize their mental health and show their creative side. Crider usually assigns the project after teaching her mental health unit. During the unit, students learn about mental health and how to identify warning signs of suicide and depression in peers or themselves. The project always showcases a wide display of diversity in AAHS students.

Collage! Nancee Crider explains how to make the collage to Walter Archer.

Crider’s classes were given eight days to complete their projects.

“The project requires my students to fill out an “All About Me” sheet which asks what they want for their future career, favorite hobbies and various character traits. They also create a collage of all of their favorite hobbies, sports, food or products, picture memories and quotes. Last, they construct writing that identifies their future career goals and two of their favorite qualities from their collage,” Crider said.

Hmmm? Jacob Condron goes through magazines to see what quotes or pictures he can put on his collage.

“I push them to make their collage the best it can be because not only is it their benchmark but it also becomes a piece that they can keep and look back at their sophomore year and see what was going on in their life at that time,” Crider said.

Cut. Glue. Repeat! Sarah Graham cuts out a picture of her mom to put on her collage.

Criders’ class got four days to complete the project in class.

“I found it really easy to stay on task because mostly everyone was working the whole period,” sophomore Sarah Graham said.

Do you like it? Mya Crownover shows Ethan Pacifico her project to ask for advice.

Crider’s students also had to present their projects in front of the class to explain the choices they made for their collage.

“I hope my students see the many similarities with their peers, and I also want them to recognize and appreciate their own unique qualities, talents and interests,” Crider said.