Cinder moves traditional fairy tale to post-apocalyptic world

Wanda Vanish

Wanda Vanish, Adviser

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We all remember the fairy tale story of a younger sister oppressed by her family waiting to be rescued by her fairy god mother and the prince.  At the start of this novel, the first of the Lunar Chronicles, I couldn’t help but to roll my eyes as the cyborg version of Cinderella is revealed.  But then within a few chapters I was hooked and flipping the pages to find out if Cinder would escape to freedom or become the victim of a terrible plague overtaking the country.

Not being a fan of dystopia and fantasy, I picked up this book to try to have more recommendations for my students who are fans.  This book came highly recommended on Goodreads and is a part of a series so I figured why not.  Cinder is a 16 year old cyborg living in New Beijing. Cinder is an amazing mechanic but being cyborg has its pros and cons.  She can detect lies and downloads useful information yet she can’t cry or blush.  Her evil syep-mother/guardian keeps all the money she earns and won’t let her buy a new foot to fit her body instead of the 11 year old foot she possesses.  She loves her one step-sister but the other leaves a lot to be desired.

In the midst of the family conflict, Prince Kai shows up at her booth and needs his android fixed.  He likes Cinder but he has no idea she is an android.  Cinder is left with her only android friend trying to figure out how to make a better life for herself and for her country and yet not abandon a chance at love.  But is she really who she seems?

Imagining a future world gives many authors inspiration for their stories and Marissa Myer’s future world is fascinating.  After four world wars what is left and how will the countries forge ahead.  This series explores Myer’s futuristic world yet doesn’ leave the reader feeling incomplete at the conclusion of the first novel.  Yes, I will read on but there is enough of a conclusion to Cinder to fulfill me as a reader until I decide to return to the world of New Beijing.