Early education needed to deter students from E cigarettes

By Sarah Johnson from Irvine California, United States [CC BY 4.0  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Sarah Johnson from Irvine California, United States [CC BY 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Sarah Johnson from Irvine California, United States [CC BY 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Miranda Wertz, Reporter

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Juuls and Suorins are the new cigarettes. Students are taking in more than one pack of cigarettes for every pod consumed, leaving teens subtly hooked and growing into an addiction overtime. What was once made to help adults stop smoking is now used by teens who have never smoked before.

Tobacco and nicotine products are not allowed on school property, leaving teens to endure withdrawal throughout the school day. Students are skipping class to vape, sneaking it in during class and even getting nurses passes to leave. As awful as it sounds, there needs to be another option. Allowing students to wear nicotine patches or chewing nicotine infused gum could help fulfill the need for the drug. Telling the students “no” only pushes kids to be sneaky and mischievous.

The school should also bring in drug and alcohol counselors once a week to help these students with their withdrawal and substance abuse. Another option would be making a drug and alcohol informational class showing the long term effects.

Studies show 72% of smokers come from lower income communities. The more education students have at a young age the less likely they are to smoke or vape when given the opportunity. By lowering smoking rates students will raise their attendance, raise their test scores, have higher college acceptance rates and be placed in the workforce.

Younger students in elementary school should be the main focus in deterring students from vaping. In the long run, everything starts with the kids. Focusing on those who haven’t started smoking is easier than fixing those who are already addicted.